Monthly Archives: October 2019

Daniel Finn: “One Man’s Terrorist” – Meeting Maynooth, 12 November 2019

“Voices of 1968 around the world: a reading”: next Tuesday 22nd @ 12, Maynooth.

The Cedar Lounge Revolution

Mentioned in comments during the week.

“Voices of 1968 around the world: a reading”: next Tuesday 22nd @ 12, Maynooth.

The radical movements of the “long 1968” shook the postwar order from Prague to Paris, Derry to Mexico City, Rome to San Francisco. “Voices of 1968” (Pluto) lets those movements speak in their own words – posters, flyers, graffiti, manifestos, songs, underground texts and more.

More about the book at https://www.plutobooks.com/9780745338088/voices-of-1968/

Co-editor Dr Laurence Cox will be reading from some of the texts in the book with a slideshow in the background – revolutions produce some cracking writers, speakers and graphic artists!

Iontas seminar room (2.31, top floor), Maynooth University (north end, beside the “water feature”).
https://www.facebook.com/events/nuim-iontas-building/the-voices-of-1968-around-the-world-a-reading/646538665836046/.

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Public Talk Maynooth: Daniel Finn on ‘One Man’s Terrorist’

Dan Finn

We’ve, meaning the doctoral students in Maynooth’s Arts and Humanities Institute, been lucky enough to get access to funding to bring in a speaker that coincides with our overlapping interests, and I’m happy to ‘announce’ that Daniel Finn exists in this overlap.  He’ll be talking about his new book out from Verso but if you’re not familiar with his other writings on subjects as diverse as the PKK, Corbynism and the life and work of critic and commentator of Fintan O’Toole, you should be imo

If you happen to be around Maynooth at the advertised time, we’d be very happy to see you there!

Time to Say Good-Bye

The Untranslated

Gerard ter Borch, Man on Horseback. Image Source

There is no better opportunity to announce the closing of The Untranslated than after climbing the K2 of world literature (i. e. Stefano D’Arrigo’s Horcynus Orca), for the place of Mount Everest will always be reserved for Finnegans Wake, while Zettel’s Traum is more like the Mariana Trench. If you have read my fifth-anniversary blog post, this announcement should not come as a complete surprise. Some of my readers have been genuinely puzzled about all the effort that comes into my reviews, and this realisation has finally caught up with me. I would like to find a different use for this energy, preferably more enjoyable and fulfilling for myself. I’ve realised that being a polyglot whizz kid who can read Ulysses-like books in multiple languages and write painstakingly detailed reviews of them is not a thing for…

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